Until The Martians Arrive
... NW MEXICO CITY
Until The Martians Arrive
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tmagazine:

Photograph by François Coquerel
Eleven years ago, Jean-Michel Casalonga, a goofy mutton-chopped kid from Perpignan, France, was studying for an advanced degree in physics when he decided to switch career paths and become a shoemaker. He probably shouldn’t have been able to just talk his way into an apprenticeship at Berluti, one of the most prestigious men’s shoe companies. But young blood is rare in the world of bespoke footwear, and Casalonga is, if not persuasive, at least persistent. “I had to call the guy who was in charge of the workshop every week for months,” he recalled. “Finally, he just said, ‘Come in for a few weeks, and we’ll see.’ ”
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jaclynday:

Command and Control by Eric Schlosser - If you want a scary bedtime story, here you go. This book is phenomenal. It’s quite long—be forewarned if you aren’t looking to be reading the same book for a while—but it’s entirely worth your time. Schlosser digs deep into the development, maintenance, use, and misuse of nuclear weaponry in the US, with the 1980 explosion of a Titan II missile in Searcy, AR as the center point for the book. The near misses Schlosser digs up are truly frightening and it seems a miracle that we haven’t had an accidental nuclear explosion somewhere in this country yet. It’s an exhaustive look at a topic that most people know only fragments of and I found it fascinating and frightening. It’s hard to imagine the scale of devastation that modern nuclear and especially thermonuclear warheads could level—which is why Schlosser gave care to accurately describe what those events could look like and puts that in the context of the modern-day, worldwide nuclear arsenal. This was great nonfiction—one of my favorite so far this year.  
Brutal Youth by Anthony Breznican - If you like your fiction on the dark side and set inside a private school environment, here you go. The book opens with the freshmen at Saint Michael’s Catholic High School preparing for the onslaught of the traditional senior vs. freshmen initiation rites (which are disturbing and are actually bullying, but the nuns turn a blind eye). We follow Peter Davidek through this dog eat dog social environment and we see his fellow students make bargains with the seniors for perceived special treatment or they simply try to disappear and go unnoticed. There’s a corrupt priest, a kid who flings jars of dissection specimens at other students when he snaps, and a nun trying her best to think of slang synonyms for “penis” as she goes to mimic high school graffiti on the wall (she settles on cock, FYI). So yes, I recommend it. 
Dirty Work by Gabriel Weston - Dirty Work is an interesting book. It’s short but there is a lot going on. Weston, a doctor, writes about a fictional London-based OB-GYN (Nancy) who is undergoing several crises at once. Nancy has nearly just killed a patient in surgery and is sitting before a group of medical professionals to determine if she’s fit to practice. Nancy, as it turns out, botched an abortion she was performing. There is very little political to be found here. It’s not so much a debate about abortion or abortion providers. This is more about Nancy’s psychology. She questions her mistakes and begins to lose her sense of self—entirely based on her ability to provide compassionate, meaningful care. What is she if she cannot do that? In the end, I thought this book tackled a very important (and controversial) topic in a nuanced, self-aware way. 
Working Stiff by Judy Melinek, M.D. and T.J. Mitchell - I loved this book. Well, first—a warning. If you’re squeamish, do not read this. I really mean it. Move along. If you’re not (or too curious to remember you are actually squeamish), then you should read it. Melinek and her husband co-wrote it (“hey honey, let’s write about the time I sawed the guy…”)—and the book is about her rookie year as an NYC medical examiner. Melinek has a blunt, objective story-telling style and it grabbed me right from the first page. She maintains her professional demeanor throughout, but still wrote a colorful, interesting book about exactly what a medical examiner does, how they do it, and why it is important. She is not without a sense of humor and occasionally I can see her rubbing her hands together like, yes! Let’s explain how we crack open the skulls! At one point she mentions that everyone at dinner parties always insists she tell them her “worst case” and she always demurs. “Guys, you don’t want to know. Trust me.” But she writes about it in this book. It is really, really horrible. Later, about a quarter from the end of the book, Melinek switches gears and gives the reader a look from inside the NYC Medical Examiner’s office during and post-9/11. It is a memoir worth reading for a lot of reasons, but especially for the bravery, hard work and compassion that Melinek and her colleagues exhibited during that time. 
Read any of these?
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bbook:

We’d finish our day and then I’d either be with Abel or I’d be on the phone with Abel and the writer, and we’d be working on what we’re doing the next day. So outside of sleep, and he did enter my dreams, that’s what we’re doing. I’s fluid like that, and that’s another reason why I like Abel, it’s scary and it’s chaotic but it’s alive and we bang away. So there’s really no rest and no going away. While normally I used to always say, oh I don’t stay in character, when the camera’s turned off everything goes back inside me and I’m just ol’ Willem from Wisconsin. But the truth is, when you’re working twelve hours a day in a certain frame of mind and you’re willing identification and you want to inhabit a set of situations and thoughts, it transforms you.
Willem Dafoe on Becoming Pier Paolo Pasolini for Abel Ferrara
Movies: Trailers and Clips for Take Me to the River
In Landscapes | Petros Koublis
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fashion for this winter
wanted part 1
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JEREMY SCOTT FALL WINTER 14
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a-bittersweet-life:

Art of Cinema issues are making a comeback! Spark your filmmaking passion and enjoy past editions of Art of Cinema, each issue with a lucky 7 sources of inspiration for all things cinematic presented by A-BitterSweet-Life.
a-bittersweet-life:

Art of Cinema issues are making a comeback! Spark your filmmaking passion and enjoy past editions of Art of Cinema, each issue with a lucky 7 sources of inspiration for all things cinematic presented by A-BitterSweet-Life.
a-bittersweet-life:

Art of Cinema issues are making a comeback! Spark your filmmaking passion and enjoy past editions of Art of Cinema, each issue with a lucky 7 sources of inspiration for all things cinematic presented by A-BitterSweet-Life.
a-bittersweet-life:

Art of Cinema issues are making a comeback! Spark your filmmaking passion and enjoy past editions of Art of Cinema, each issue with a lucky 7 sources of inspiration for all things cinematic presented by A-BitterSweet-Life.
a-bittersweet-life:

Art of Cinema issues are making a comeback! Spark your filmmaking passion and enjoy past editions of Art of Cinema, each issue with a lucky 7 sources of inspiration for all things cinematic presented by A-BitterSweet-Life.
a-bittersweet-life:

Art of Cinema issues are making a comeback! Spark your filmmaking passion and enjoy past editions of Art of Cinema, each issue with a lucky 7 sources of inspiration for all things cinematic presented by A-BitterSweet-Life.
a-bittersweet-life:

Art of Cinema issues are making a comeback! Spark your filmmaking passion and enjoy past editions of Art of Cinema, each issue with a lucky 7 sources of inspiration for all things cinematic presented by A-BitterSweet-Life.
a-bittersweet-life:

Art of Cinema issues are making a comeback! Spark your filmmaking passion and enjoy past editions of Art of Cinema, each issue with a lucky 7 sources of inspiration for all things cinematic presented by A-BitterSweet-Life.
a-bittersweet-life:

Art of Cinema issues are making a comeback! Spark your filmmaking passion and enjoy past editions of Art of Cinema, each issue with a lucky 7 sources of inspiration for all things cinematic presented by A-BitterSweet-Life.
a-bittersweet-life:

Art of Cinema issues are making a comeback! Spark your filmmaking passion and enjoy past editions of Art of Cinema, each issue with a lucky 7 sources of inspiration for all things cinematic presented by A-BitterSweet-Life.
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berfrois:



Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzay have been awarded the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize
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“It is the only moment when I can become myself, when I drive my car”

“It is the only moment when I can become myself, when I drive my car”
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shoelust:

Manish Arora SS15
shoelust:

Manish Arora SS15
shoelust:

Manish Arora SS15
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berfrois:



Patrick Modiano has been awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Literature